U.S. Army Combatives – FM 3-25.150

3-06 Finishing Moves

3-6. FINISHING MOVES

When dominant body position has been achieved the fighter can attempt to finish the fight secure in the knowledge that if an attempt fails, as long as he maintains dominant position, he may simply try again.

a. Rear Naked Choke. Chokes are the most effective method of disabling an enemy. This technique should only be executed from the back mount after both leg hooks are in place.

(1) Step 1 (Figure 3-36). Leaving the weak hand in place, the fighter reaches around the enemy’s neck and under his chin with the strong hand.

Figure 3-36. Rear naked choke, step 1.

Figure 3-36. Rear naked choke, step 1.

(2) Step 2 (Figure 3-37). The fighter now places the biceps of the weak hand under the strong hand, moves the weak hand to the back of the enemy’s head, and completes the choke by expanding his chest.

Figure 3-37. Rear naked choke, step 2.

Figure 3-37. Rear naked choke, step 2.

b. Cross Collar Choke from the Mount and Guard. This technique can only be executed from the guard or the mount.

(1) Step 1 (Figure 3-38). With the weak hand, the fighter grasps the enemy’s collar and pulls it open.

Figure 3-38. Cross collar choke from the mount, step 1.

Figure 3-38. Cross collar choke from the mount, step 1.

(2) Step 2 (Figure 3-39). While keeping a hold with the weak hand, the fighter now inserts his strong hand, fingers first, onto the collar. The hand should be relaxed and reach around to the back of the neck grasping the collar.

Figure 3-39. Cross collar choke from the mount, step 2.

Figure 3-39. Cross collar choke from the mount, step 2.

(3) Step 3 (Figure 3-40). After grasping the back of the enemy’s collar, the fighter inserts the weak hand under the strong hand and into the collar, fingers first, touching or very close to the first hand.

Figure 3-40. Cross collar choke from the mount, step 3.

Figure 3-40. Cross collar choke from the mount, step 3.

(4) Step 4 (Figure 3-41). The fighter turns his wrists so that the palms face toward him, and brings his elbows to his side. He will complete the choke by expanding his chest and pulling with the muscles of his back.

Figure 3-41. Cross collar choke from the mount, step 4.

Figure 3-41. Cross collar choke from the mount, step 4.

Note: If the fighter is applying this choke from the mount, he should put his head on the ground on the side of the top hand and relax into the choke.

c. Front Guillotine Choke. Many times this technique may be used as a counter to the double leg takedown.

(1) Step 1 (Figure 3-42). As the enemy shoots in toward the fighter’s legs, the fighter should ensure that the enemy’s head goes underneath one of his arms. The fighter wraps his arm around the enemy’s head and under his neck. The fighter’s palm should be facing his own chest.

Figure 3-42. Front guillotine choke, step 1.

Figure 3-42. Front guillotine choke, step 1.

(2) Step 2 (Figure 3-43). With the other hand, the fighter grasps the first hand, ensuring that he has not reached around the enemy’s arm, and pulls upward with both hands.

Figure 3-43. Front guillotine choke, step 2.

Figure 3-43. Front guillotine choke, step 2.

(3) Step 3 (Figure 3-44). He now sits down and places the enemy within his guard, and finishes the choke by pulling with his arms and pushing with his legs.

Figure 3-44. Front guillotine choke, step 3.

Figure 3-44. Front guillotine choke, step 3.

d. Bent Arm Bar from the Mount and Cross Mount.

(1) Step 1 (Figure 3-45). When the fighter has mounted the enemy, the enemy may try to cover his face by putting both arms up. Using the heel of his hand, the fighter drives the enemy’s wrist to the ground ensuring that his elbow goes to the elbow notch (elbow between collarbone and the head with pressure against the neck).

Figure 3-45. Bent arm bar from the mount and cross mount, step 1.

Figure 3-45. Bent arm bar from the mount and cross mount, step 1.

 

Figure 3-45. Bent arm bar from the mount and cross mount, step 1 (continued).

Figure 3-45. Bent arm bar from the mount and cross mount, step 1 (continued).

(2) Step 2 (Figure 3-46). With the other hand, the fighter reaches under the enemy’s bent arm and grasps his own wrist.

Figure 3-46. Bent arm bar from the mount and cross mount, step 2.

Figure 3-46. Bent arm bar from the mount and cross mount, step 2.

(3) Step 3 (Figure 3-47). The fighter raises the enemy’s elbow and at the same time drags the back of his hand along the ground like a paint brush, breaking the enemy’s arm at the shoulder.

Figure 3-47. Bent arm bar from the mount and cross mount, step 3.

Figure 3-47. Bent arm bar from the mount and cross mount, step 3.

e. Straight Arm Bar from the Mount.

(1) Step 1 (Figure 3-48). From the mount, the enemy may attempt to push the fighter off with his arms. The fighter places both of his arms on the enemy’s chest ensuring that his arm goes over the targeted arm.

Figure 3-48. Straight arm bar from the mount, step 1.

Figure 3-48. Straight arm bar from the mount, step 1.

(2) Step 2 (Figure 3-49). Placing all of his weight on the enemy’s chest, the fighter pops up and places his feet under him, ensuring that he keeps his butt low.

Figure 3-49. Straight arm bar from the mount, step 2.

Figure 3-49. Straight arm bar from the mount, step 2.

(3) Step 3 (Figure 3-50). Keeping his weight on the enemy’s chest, he now swings his leg around and over the enemy’s head and slides down the arm.

Figure 3-50. Straight arm bar from the mount, step 3.

Figure 3-50. Straight arm bar from the mount, step 3.

(4) Step 4 (Figure 3-51). The fighter now pinches the enemy’s arm between his legs, grasps the arm at the wrist, and falls back extending the arm. The breaking action is hip pressure against the elbow joint.

Figure 3-51. Straight arm bar from the mount, step 4.

Figure 3-51. Straight arm bar from the mount, step 4.

f. Straight Arm Bar from the Guard.

(1) Step 1 (Figure 3-52). When the fighter is on his back with the enemy in his guard, the enemy will sometimes present a straight arm such as when trying to choke. The fighter should secure the target arm above the shoulder.

Figure 3-52. Straight arm bar from the guard, step 1.

Figure 3-52. Straight arm bar from the guard, step 1.

(2) Step 2 (Figure 3-53). The fighter inserts his other hand under the enemy’s leg on the side opposite the targeted arm. The hand should be palm up.

Figure 3-53. Straight arm bar from the guard, step 2.

Figure 3-53. Straight arm bar from the guard, step 2.

(3) Step 3 (Figure 3-54). By releasing his legs from around the enemy’s waist and raising them above him, the fighter changes his center of gravity.

Figure 3-54. Straight arm bar from the guard, step 3.

Figure 3-54. Straight arm bar from the guard, step 3.

(4) Step 4 (Figure 3-55). He now curls his back to give himself a point on which to spin, and by pulling with the arm on the side opposite the targeted arm, he spins around and places his leg over the enemy’s head, capturing the target arm between his legs.

Figure 3-55. Straight arm bar from the guard, step 4.

Figure 3-55. Straight arm bar from the guard, step 4.

(5) Step 5 (Figure 3-56). The fighter now brings his hand from under the enemy’s leg and secures the wrist of the targeted arm, completing the move by breaking the targeted arm with pressure from his hips.

Figure 3-56. Straight arm bar from the guard, step 5.

Figure 3-56. Straight arm bar from the guard, step 5.

g. Sweep from the Attempted Straight Arm Bar.

(1) Step 1 (Figure 3-57). If the enemy tucks his head in to avoid the arm bar, The fighter maintains his grip on the enemy’s leg and swings his own leg down to gain momentum. The fighter ensures that he curls his leg under after swinging it down.

Figure 3-57. Sweep from the attempted straight arm bar, step 1.

Figure 3-57. Sweep from the attempted straight arm bar, step 1.

(2) Step 2 (Figure 3-58). The fighter pushes the enemy straight over with his other leg and finishes mounted.

Figure 3-58. Sweep from the attempted straight arm bar, step 2.

Figure 3-58. Sweep from the attempted straight arm bar, step 2.

Figure 3-58. Sweep from the attempted straight arm bar, step 2 (continued).

Figure 3-58. Sweep from the attempted straight arm bar, step 2 (continued).


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