U.S. Army Combatives – FM 3-25.150

6-03 Kicks

6-3. KICKS

Kicks during hand-to-hand combat are best directed at low targets and should be simple but effective. Combat soldiers are usually burdened with combat boots and LCE. His flexibility level is usually low during combat, and if engaged in hand-to-hand combat, he will be under high stress. He must rely on gross motor skills and kicks that do not require complicated movement or much training and practice to execute.

a. Lead Leg Front Kick (Figure 6-10). The lead leg front kick is not a very powerful kick, but it can be a very good tool to help control the range. The target should be the enemy’s thigh, just above the knee. The striking surface is the sole of the foot. It is very important that if the kick does not land, your foot should not slide off toward the enemy’s back. This would present your back to him.

Figure 6-10. Lead leg front kick.

Figure 6-10. Lead leg front kick.

b. Rear Leg Front Kick (Figure 6-11). The rear leg front kick is a much more powerful kick. The best target is the abdomen. The striking surface should be either the ball of the foot or the entire sole of the foot.

Figure 6-11. Rear leg front kick.

Figure 6-11. Rear leg front kick.

c. Shin Kick. The shin kick is a powerful kick, and it is easily performed with little training. When the legs are targeted, the kick is hard to defend against (Figure 6-12), and an opponent can be dropped by it.

Figure 6-12. Shin kick to the outer thigh.

Figure 6-12. Shin kick to the outer thigh.

d. Stepping Side Kick (Figure 6-13). A soldier starts a stepping side kick (Step 1) by stepping either behind or in front of his other foot to close the distance between him and his opponent. The movement is like that in a skip. The soldier now brings the knee of his kicking foot up and thrusts out a sidekick (Step 2). Tremendous power and momentum can be developed in this kick.

Figure 6-13. Stepping side kick.

Figure 6-13. Stepping side kick.

e. Knee Strike (Figure 6-14). A knee strike can be a devastating weapon. It is best used when in the clinch, at very close range, or when the enemy is against a wall. The best target is the head, but the thigh or body may also be targeted under certain conditions.

Figure 6-14. Knee strike.

Figure 6-14. Knee strike.


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